Newbie question what frequencies are we designing for?

I see we have VHF and UHF, but I have not found what frequencies we should be designing for.

Looking at the ARRL Band plan for VHF looks like 144.3-144.5 MHz and 145.5-145.8 MHz
So when we are designing for VHF those are the target frequencies, or is it more? What is the high and low VHF frequencies we should be expecting?

Similarly with UHF 435.00-438.00 MHz is the satellite part of the band plan. Is that where we expect all of the UHF satellite reception? If not then what is the minimum and maximum UHF frequencies we should be designing for?

The reason for the question is I have been looking at filters and LNA.
AR2 ( P28VD ) has some Amateur Satellite receive only LNA with Filters for 136-138 MHz and another one for 144-148 MHz and another one for 420-450 MHz. What should I be getting? I am planning to have separate VHF and UHF systems. Or is there a better way to do it?

I could not find anything more specific in the Wiki other than UHF and VHF.

Why not look at some existing satellite observations and see where these satellites are transmitting. Find out what it is you are interested in and focus on those frequencies. I found and got started by watching the weather satellites before I joined SATNOGS. You will find the 2m band just below 146MHz is very congested with satellites.

Kipton,

Bob - VK2BYF’s advice is spot on. Start with something simple. I found that the NOAA weather satellites down at 137MHz were the easiest to receive. They transmit higher power than most of the amateur band satellites and they transmit 100% of the time so if there is a pass going over you can be pretty certain it will be there. The amateur band sats don’t always transmit It may be there but not receiving it may not mean your kit is not working. There are some sats in they amateur bands that transmit most of the time like Saral and the FalconSat sats up in 435MHz band. Out of interest I found with a RTL-SDR on my TV antenna I could easily get pretty good signals and images from the NOAA sats but when I moved to the amateur bands I really needed a LNA up near the antenna because of the satellites transmit lower powers. My advice is start simple and work your way up.

John - VK4JBE

This is the number of transmitters in the Satnogs DB, per frequency in MHz. You can use the table to see what frequencies would catch most transmitters, or what frequencies the network lacks stations for.

Frequency (MHz) Number of stations Number of transmitters in DB Stations per transmitter
108 219 0
109 220 0
110 221 0
115 222 0
116 223 0
118 225 0
120 230 0
121 229 1 229
125 230 0
127 231 0
130 274 1 274
131 276 0
132 279 0
135 1350 0
136 1359 10 135,9
137 1385 30 46,16666667
138 1386 0
140 1363 0
143 1360 1 1360
144 1498 1 1498
145 1505 178 8,45505618
148 1297 2 648,5
149 325 1 325
150 329 2 164,5
161 238 1 238
166 237 1 237
200 225 0
212 223 0
236 223 1 223
240 224 0
258 224 1 224
300 224 0
380 222 0
390 226 0
399 229 2 114,5
400 300 43 6,976744186
401 300 89 3,370786517
402 297 3 99
404 290 0
410 293 0
420 299 0
425 313 0
426 314 0
430 1211 0
432 1236 1 1236
433 1240 0
434 1241 1 1241
435 1272 212 6
436 1274 151 8,437086093
437 1273 445 2,860674157
438 1273 2 636,5
449 1061 3 353,6666667
450 1059 2 529,5
460 1036 0
462 1030 0
465 1029 8 128,625
467 1029 2 514,5
468 1029 3 343
471 234 0
630 207 2 103,5
631 207 2 103,5
632 207 1 207
700 208 0
750 209 0
868 206 1 206
900 206 0
903 204 2 102
915 205 8 25,625
1000 106 0
1050 129 0
1066 129 1 129
1240 75 0
1500 60 0
1544 59 5 11,8
1545 59 1 59
1600 67 0
1616 66 1 66
1650 69 0
1691 68 1 68
1698 68 2 34
1700 67 2 33,5
1701 64 3 21,33333333
1702 64 1 64
1704 64 2 32
1705 64 1 64
1707 64 3 21,33333333
2000 11 0
2200 38 1 38
2209 38 1 38
2215 38 1 38
2218 38 1 38
2219 38 1 38
2224 38 1 38
2228 38 2 19
2229 38 1 38
2230 38 3 12,66666667
2231 38 1 38
2232 38 1 38
2233 38 1 38
2234 38 2 19
2235 38 5 7,6
2240 38 1 38
2241 38 1 38
2242 38 1 38
2244 38 1 38
2245 38 7 5,428571429
2246 38 2 19
2247 38 1 38
2249 38 1 38
2250 38 1 38
2252 37 1 37
2256 37 1 37
2261 37 1 37
2262 37 1 37
2263 37 5 7,4
2265 37 1 37
2266 37 1 37
2273 37 2 18,5
2274 37 3 12,33333333
2277 37 1 37
2282 37 1 37
2283 37 1 37
2296 37 3 12,33333333
2306 28 1 28
2400 30 5 6
2401 28 10 2,8
2402 28 3 9,333333333
2403 28 2 14
2404 28 2 14
2405 28 2 14
2406 28 2 14
2408 28 1 28
2409 28 1 28
2410 28 1 28
2412 28 1 28
2415 28 1 28
2417 28 3 9,333333333
2420 28 1 28
2425 28 1 28
2426 28 1 28
2432 28 1 28
2435 28 1 28
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mfalkvidd that is exactly what I was looking for. I do not yet know how to query the database for that info, but that is perfect.

I did not know there were satellites above 148 MHz and below 400 MHz.

As a result of your table I can see the difference between a band pass filter for 144-148 MHz versus one for 130 - 150 MHz. That is what I was trying to figure out. The answer is 184 Satellites versus 230 Satellites or 25% more for the wider coverage.

I am planning to put a station in my summer home SW of Traverse City, Michigan. (Does not seem like any stations in that area.) I am buying parts, and testing at my winter home in Texas, before I head up there in May.

The LNA and filtering is what has been giving me problems. Some LNA include filtering, while others work from 30MHz to 6GHz, so I have to buy or make a filter. Trying to understand the tradeoffs is what I am trying to do.

Thank you very much.

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Have a look at AMSAT-UK - IARU Satellite Database

Also check the spectrum visualization we have for all transmitters we track in SatNOGS here:
https://db.satnogs.org/transmitters/#spectrum

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